August 23, 2017

LSAT Releases Ten New Actual LSAT Tests With Comparative Reading

When you prepare for the LSAT it is essential to use actual LSAT questions. The individual test books are available for purchase from LSAT. The most economical way to purchase the tests is in books of 10. At the present time LSAT has released:

– 10 Actual LSATs  (Tests 9 – 18)

– 10 More Actual LSATs (Tests 19 – 28)

– The Next 10  Actual LSATs (Tests 29 – 38)

In September 2009, I blogged that LSAT would be releasing a new book of 10 LSATs.

The wait is over – just in time for you to prepare for the June 6, 2011 LSAT. I just receive an email from Amazon announcing that on March 1, 2011, LSAT will  be releasing:

Ten New Actual Official LSAT PrepTests with Comparative Readings

This book will be essential for your LSAT Preparation. We are including it with all of our Toronto LSAT Preparation Courses. It includes LSAT PrepTests 52 – 61 which are the LSAT tests from September 2007 to October 2010. The June 2007 LSAT is available as a free free LSAT download from Law Services.

The Secret Language of The LSAT (Not) – LSAT Quantifiers

The Secret Language of The LSAT (Not) – LSAT Quantifiers

It’s important that LSAT courses, LSAT tutors and third party LSAT books justify their existence. Therefore, LSAT courses and books focus on every conceivable aspect of the LSAT.

The bottom line is that the LSAT is a test of reading and reasoning in context.  High LSAT test scores require effective reading and  a heightened awareness of language.  Given that the LSAT is a reading test, difficulty is to be presumed. There are certain instances where language distracts test takers, creates huge anxiety, and provokes endless discussion. One such area is the use of “quantifiers” on the LSAT. Here is an email that I received from a student:

“Hi John:

I have a question regarding the words few and some. In LSAT world are they of equivalent meaning.

I know some indicates, in numerical terms, 1-100.

But what would few be in numerical terms.

Cheers,”

(Those interested in my response are invited to see:

http://lsattoronto.wordpress.com/2010/02/02/lsat-poll-meaning-of-the-word-few/)

Who could have imagined that a Law School Bound student, would be interested in this question?

What is a quantifier?

Even if you have not heard the word (it sounds boring), you can probably figure it out. It seems to be based on the word “quantity” which means “how many”.  A “quantifier” is a word that that describes “how many” or “what proportion”. Quantifiers are common in everyday language. Here are some examples: “all”, “none”, “most”, ”many”, ”few”, “several”, “some”. These words are so common on the LSAT that at least one (that means a minimum of one, but does not preclude all) scholar has written an essay about the use of quantifiers on the LSAT. For your reading pleasure I refer you to:

http://nlp.stanford.edu/projects/nlkr/scoper.pdf [Read more…]